Man's fry-up slammed for looking like a COW PAT – but it's actually a Welsh delicacy

THIS man's bizzare brekkie left disgusted foodies comparing it to COW PAT – but it's actually a Welsh speciality.

A snap of the apparently charred dish was uploaded to Facebook by Chris H and titled All Day Breakfast.

Some confused social-media users compared his blackened brekkie to tarmac or soot next to to fried bread and bacon on a plate.

But other diners on the food-rating page spotted the meal was actually cockles and laverbread cakes, a Welsh delicacy made of seaweed, rolled in oatmeal and fried.

Jo Merry said: "Since when did 'all day breakfast' include cow pat?"

Ryan Lawn added: “I love soot from my chimney put on my breakfast in the morning, it keeps hunger locked up til lunch lol haha.”

Ashley Woodcock said: “There’s nothing I love more than a bit of topsoil with my breakfast.”

'FLOOR OF A CREMATORIUM'

Ray Mason quipped: “Ahh lovely breakfast with a whole pot of mint sauce on top!!”

While Holly Glassbrook posted a snap of road workers putting down tarmac and said: “Live footage of Chris H’s all day breakfast being prepared.”



Dave Rowland said: “Just because it is called an all-day breakfast doesn’t mean you have to cook it all day!”

Nathan Bones added: “Looks like the floor of a crematorium. Say hi to my Nan for me.”

Eamonn Keaveney said: “Is it called an all-day breakfast because you cooked it in a furnace for 24 hours?”

And Carla Woodburn said: “I’d rather eat the plate.”

'PROPER WELSH BREKKIE'

But some people noticed what the Welsh delicacy was straight away, and suggested adding tomato or eggs.

Donna Louise Lattka said: “OK so the presentation could have been better.

“But until you’ve tried fried cockles, laverbread, smoked bacon and friend bread DON’T KNOCK IT.

“The only thing I’d add, friend toms and a sunny side up egg, yummy!”

Melissa Birchall said: “Proper Welsh Gower brekkie! Love laverbread, bacon and cockles! Yum.”

And Jason Davies added: “Beautiful love cockles and laverbread.”

The dish uses seaweed from the west coast of Britain and the east coast of Ireland.

Laver seaweed has a high content of minerals, particularly iodine and iron.

It tastes like olives or oyster and is traditionally eaten fried with bacon and cockles for a Welsh breakfast.

It is also paired with hog's pudding in the south west of England.



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