Queen bassist John Deacon, 69, looks worlds away from his rocker days

Queen bassist John Deacon, 69, looks worlds away from his rocker days as he smokes a cigarette while making a rare appearance on a stroll

He shot to fame back in the 80s as the bassist in legendary British band, Queen. 

And John Deacon looked worlds away from his rocker days as he enjoyed a low-key stroll while puffing on a cigarette near his south-west London home.

The musician, 69, looked casual in a navy zip-up fleece, teamed with a pair of dark jeans and simple black trainers while making a rare appearance. 

Retired rocker: Former Queen bassist John Deacon looked worlds away from his rocker days as he enjoyed a low-key stroll while puffing on a cigarette near his south-west London home 

The father-of-six resides in south-west London with his wife Veronica Tetzlaff, and the unassuming former rocker is estimated to be worth a whopping £130 million.

Since retiring from the music industry in 1997, the Another One Bites The Dust Writer has led a private life and steered away from any publicity surrounding the band. 

The bass player even made the decision not to join his bandmates and their induction into the Rock and Roll Music Hall of Fame in 2001.

He did approve of the Rami Malek-fronted Freddie Mercury biopic, Bohemian Rhapsody, which won critical acclaim and became a box office hit in 2018. 

Approval: He did not attend Queen’s induction into the Rock and Roll Music Hall of Fame in 2001, but the bass player (pictured during the 1980s)  approved of 2018’s Bohemian Rhapsody 

Throwback: Deacon (right) shot to fame back in the 80s as the bassist in legendary British band, Queen (pictured clockwise from left with Roger Taylor, Freddie Mercury and Brian May)

Deacon quit Queen when their frontman, Freddie Mercury, died in 1991.

After Mercury’s death from AIDS-related complications, Deacon performed twice more with the band in 1992 and 1997 tribute concerts.

He said of Freddie’s death at the time: ‘As far as we are concerned, this is it. There is no point carrying on. It is impossible to replace Freddie.

‘I can’t sing; it’s the one thing I wish I could do, because it would make songwriting so much easier!’ 

Deacon is now believed to have not had contact with his former bandmates for more than a decade. 

Unassuming: The musician, 69, looked casual in a navy zip-up fleece, teamed with a pair of dark jeans and simple black trainers while making a rare appearance

Talented: The father-of-six resides in south-west London with his wife Veronica Tetzlaff, and the unassuming former rocker is estimated to be worth a whopping £130 million 

Guitarist Brian May, 73, previously said: ‘It’s his choice. He doesn’t contact us. John was quite delicate all along.’

Last month, Deacon was seen in incredible photographs taken from May’s personal collection and released to commemorate Queen’s 50th anniversary.  

The series of never-before-seen images have been compiled in a book titled Queen 3D. 

May took many of the photos with a stereoscopic camera, which uses two lenses to simultaneously take a pair of images that, when seen through a special viewer, create what appears to be a three-dimensional photograph.  

Speaking about the project, the musician said: ‘Each unlocks a story. I’ve always felt that 3D pictures were a thousand times more powerful than flat snaps. 

Shunning the spotlight: Since retiring from the music industry in 1997, Deacon (right) has led a private life and steered away from any publicity surrounding the band (pictured in 1973)

‘But some of these 3D moments are so extraordinarily evocative that I was actually shocked myself what recollections they brought out of my head.’ 

To mark their golden jubilee, the iconic British band will also host a 50-episode series on their YouTube channel.

From concerts in the 70s to blistering present day performances featuring American Idol star Adam Lambert, 39, the band released a statement confirming the news on Friday.

It read: ‘Presented in chronological order, the series will take you from Queen’s earliest shows at London’s Rainbow and Odeon through vast arenas across the entire world on a journey culminating with the band’s latest record-setting achievements with Adam Lambert.’ 

Back in the day: After Mercury’s death from AIDS-related complications, Deacon (second right) performed twice more with the band in 1992 and 1997 tribute concerts

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