The Who's Roger Daltrey takes a swipe at today's 'woke generation'

‘It’s terrifying, the miserable world they’re going to create’: The Who’s Roger Daltrey criticises today’s ‘woke generation’ and says he’s ‘privileged’ to have lived in the ‘golden era’

He’s part of one of the biggest bands rock bands of the 20th century, having sold over 100 million records worldwide during their illustrious 50 year career.

And The Who’s Roger Daltry has taken a swipe at today’s ‘woke generation’ as he declared it’s ‘terrifying’ that they are creating a ‘miserable world’ for themselves.

In a new Interview, the lead singer, 77, added that he feels ‘privileged’ to have grown up in a ‘golden era’.

Having his say: The Who’s Roger Daltry has taken a swipe at today’s ‘woke generation’ as he declared it’s ‘terrifying’ that they are creating a ‘miserable world’ for themselves

Roger had joined band mate Pete Townshend, 75, on Zane Lowe’s Apple Music 1, as they celebrated the release of the super deluxe version of their hit third studio album The Who Sell Out’.

And amid talk about their long career and their hopes to tour again, Roger had some harsh criticism when talk soon turned to contemporary politics and today’s society.

After ranting about anti-vaxxers, he turned his attention to politics as he said: ‘It’s just getting harder to disseminate the truth. It’s almost like, now we should turn the whole thing off. Go back to newsprint, go back to word of mouth and start to read books again.

‘I don’t know, we might get somewhere because it’s becoming so absurd now with AI, all the tricks it can do, and the woke generation.’ 

Those were the days: In a new Interview, the lead singer, 77, added that he feels ‘privileged’ to have grown up in a ‘golden era’ (pictured with The Who band mates [L-R] John Entwistle, Keith Moon and Pete Townshend in 1971)

Discussing the ‘woke generation’ further, he went on: ‘It’s terrifying, the miserable world they’re going to create for themselves. I mean, anyone who’s lived a life and you see what they’re doing, you just know that it’s a route to nowhere. 

‘Especially when you’ve lived through the periods of a life that we’ve had the privilege to. I mean, we’ve had the golden era. There’s no doubt about that.’

Elaborating on what he means to have been privileged during a certain time, he told how his generation had ‘came out of a war’, had came out of a ‘levelled society’, lived through socialist governments and added that he’d been to countries at the height of communism. 

Meanwhile, the Pinball Wizard hitmaker went on to discuss the band’s longevity, while also praising the songwriting talents of his band mate Pete. 

Opinion: Discussing the ‘woke generation’ further, he went on: ‘It’s terrifying, the miserable world they’re going to create for themselves’

He told Zane, 47: ‘Fortunately, we did have the intelligence, or I had the intelligence, certainly, to recognise that within the abilities of Pete Townshend, we had someone really unique in his songwriting ability. 

‘He had the ability to voice that inner voice that we all have into music in a way that it struck a chord, which in itself is timeless. That’s what’s so amazing when I listen back to these records.’

Sharing why listening back to their old records can sometimes be tough, he continued: ‘And I listened back to so much of The Who’s stuff, I don’t particularly enjoy it, ’cause some painful memories in there. 

‘But I am constantly amazed that it doesn’t age. I think that’s to do with the fact that it’s coming from a centre, which is deep within us all, which is our truth. Any moment that will be part of our truths somewhere in our life. 

Younger days: ‘Especially when you’ve lived through the periods of a life that we’ve had the privilege to. I mean, we’ve had the golden era. There’s no doubt about that’ (pictured in 1978)

‘And it will resonate, and that resonance will carry it forward. It astonishes me how modern most Who music sounds today.’

The musician also went on to say that performing in the band’s early days can be likened to ‘going in to battle’, explaining: ‘In the early days, for me, it was like going to war. It was like going into battle, it really was. 

‘For a very long time there, it was like, it was us against our audience. And we were going to draw our music through them to the back of the hall. 

‘As the halls got bigger, of course, that became more and more extravagant and the volume went up and up and up. So, that was a kind of mental attitude. It was almost like a battle. 

‘And the slightest little thing used to wind me up terribly into a lot of anger and inner- anger, which again, came out within the performances.’

Praise: Meanwhile, the Pinball Wizard hitmaker went on to discuss the band’s longevity, while also praising the songwriting talents of his band mate Pete

Meanwhile, despite promoting the band’s deluxe album, Roger admitted he has ‘no interest’ in them, though he believes it is important for fans.

He stated: ‘I have to say that these new additions – it’s really good for the fans. But I’ve got no interest in them whatsoever, to be honest with you. 

‘To me, when I record a song and put it down, that’s like a painting- it’s finished. And I walk away from it. And then these things, it’s like, I in some ways feel a bit like a used car salesman, as these things come out. But then again it is important – they are important. 

‘I’m not unappreciative of what Pete does and the amount of work he puts into them. They are important. It’s just my particular bit in the group that was done 50 years ago. And I like to leave it there.’

Tough: Sharing why listening back to their old records can sometimes be tough, he continued: ‘And I listened back to so much of The Who’s stuff, I don’t particularly enjoy it, ’cause some painful memories in there

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