Your iPhone is being tracked way more than you think and Apple wants to help you stop it

We will use your email address only for sending you newsletters. Please see our Privacy Notice for details of your data protection rights.

iPhone users might be shocked by just how many apps on their devices are tracking their daily digital activities. It’s a problem that has been rife for years but Apple now wants to help its users take back more control. An upcoming software update, expected to launch in the spring, will include a feature called App Tracking Transparency which will require apps to get the user’s permission before tracking their data across apps or websites owned by other companies.

Tucked inside the Settings menu, iPhone, iPad and Apple TV users will be able to see exactly which apps have requested permission to track them with an easy option to switch it off.

Along with this software feature, Apple has also released a new document called “A Day in the Life of Your Data”.

This easy-to-understand report is aimed at helping Apple users know more about how their data is being used and how companies track them across websites and apps. The report also shares how privacy features across Apple’s products give users more transparency and control, empowering people with the tools and knowledge to protect their personal information.

“A Day in the Life of Your Data” has been launched to commemorate Data Privacy Day which takes place today, January 28.

iPhone 12: Apple unveil key features as they launch device

“Privacy means peace of mind, it means security, and it means you are in the driver’s seat when it comes to your own data,” said Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of Software Engineering. “Our goal is to create technology that keeps people’s information safe and protected. We believe privacy is a fundamental human right, and our teams work every day to embed it in everything we make.”

Apple has introduced dozens of technologies over the past few years that have been launched to safeguard user privacy and help keep users’ data safe.

For example, Safari was the first browser to block third-party cookies by default and iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra added Intelligent Tracking Prevention in Safari to further limit tracking while still enabling websites to function normally.

In 2018, Apple introduced protections to prevent companies from fingerprinting Mac — a practice in which third parties try to identify users devices based on data like fonts and plug-ins.

Speaking about today’s update from Apple, Jeff Chester, Center for Digital Democracy said: “Apple’s new data privacy tools ensure that people have greater control over their personal information. Data brokers and online advertisers will now have to act more responsibly when dealing with consumers who use third party applications on Apple devices.”

Source: Read Full Article