Georgia Republican Greene who supported QAnon wins primary

Marjorie Greene, who also made racist comments, won a Georgia primary that all but guarantees her a spot in Congress.

Marjorie Taylor Greene, a businesswoman who has expressed support for the far-right conspiracy theory QAnon and was criticised for a series of racist comments, has won the Republican nomination for Georgia’s 14th Congressional District.

Greene beat neurosurgeon John Cowan in a primary runoff for the open seat on Tuesday in the deep-red district in northwest Georgia, despite several GOP officials denouncing her campaign after videos surfaced in which she expresses racist, anti-Semitic and anti-Muslim views.

“WE WON! Thank you for your support! Save America. Stop Socialism,” Greene tweeted late on Tuesday. A video posted to her Twitter account of her victory party showed a room full of supporters gathered closely together. Few, if any, wore face masks to protect against the coronavirus.

In a victory speech posted to social media, Greene said she decided to enter politics because the country is heading in the wrong direction.

“So the Republican establishment was against me. The DC swamp has been against me. And the lying fake news media hates my guts,” she said. “Yep, it’s a badge of honour.”

Greene is a staunch supporter of President Donald Trump, who tweeted congratulations to the Republican victor, calling her a “future Republican Star”. 

“I got behind her because of her honesty,” she said. “She’s not going to be bought by anybody. I could tell that her heart was pure.”

Reardon is familiar with criticism of Greene’s social media posts and videos but says “she’s never said anything racist like they say she has,” and blamed attacks by her opponent’s campaign.

The district stretches from the outskirts of metro Atlanta to the largely rural northwest corner of the state.

The winner of the primary is a shoo-in to win in the general election, taking the seat of retiring incumbent Tom Graves.

Greene will face Kevin Van Ausdal in November. Van Ausdal acknowledged that he faces an uphill battle in the heavily conservative district in an interview on Tuesday night and called on people across the country to rally behind his campaign.

“Honestly the local Democratic money is not a lot,” he said.

“We need donors to help get out the message and show people that there is an alternative, and a great alternative, to QAnon conspiracies and divisive rhetoric,” he said.

Graves, who did not seek re-election, last won the seat with more than 76 percent of the vote in 2018.

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